Article published in:
Journal of Second Language Pronunciation
Vol. 2:1 (2016) ► pp. 2955
Cited by

Cited by 10 other publications

Burri, Michael & Amanda Baker
2021. ‘I Feel … Slightly out of Touch’: a Longitudinal Study of Teachers Learning to Teach English Pronunciation over a Six-Year Period. Applied Linguistics Crossref logo
Couper, Graeme
2017. Teacher Cognition of Pronunciation Teaching: Teachers' Concerns and Issues. TESOL Quarterly 51:4  pp. 820 ff. Crossref logo
Couper, Graeme
2019. Teachers’ cognitions of corrective feedback on pronunciation: Their beliefs, perceptions and practices. System 84  pp. 41 ff. Crossref logo
Couper, Graeme
2021. Pronunciation Teaching Issues: Answering Teachers’ Questions. RELC Journal 52:1  pp. 128 ff. Crossref logo
Couper, Graeme
2021. Teacher cognition of pronunciation teaching. Journal of Second Language Pronunciation Crossref logo
Darcy, Isabelle, Brian Rocca & Zoie Hancock
2021. A Window into the Classroom: How Teachers Integrate Pronunciation Instruction. RELC Journal 52:1  pp. 110 ff. Crossref logo
Gordon, Joshua
2020. Implementing explicit pronunciation instruction: The case of a nonnative English-speaking teacher. Language Teaching Research  pp. 136216882094199 ff. Crossref logo
Long, Avizia Yim
2017.  In Expanding Individual Difference Research in the Interaction Approach [AILA Applied Linguistics Series, 16],  pp. 202 ff. Crossref logo
Mompean, Jose A & Jonás Fouz-González
2021. Phonetic Symbols in Contemporary Pronunciation Instruction. RELC Journal 52:1  pp. 155 ff. Crossref logo
Nagle, Charles, Rebecca Sachs & Germán Zárate-Sández
2020. Spanish teachers’ beliefs on the usefulness of pronunciation knowledge, skills, and activities and their confidence in implementing them. Language Teaching Research  pp. 136216882095703 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 25 may 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

References

References

Baker, A.
(2011) Discourse prosody and teachers’ stated beliefs and practices. TESOL Journal, 2(3), 263–292. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2014) Exploring teachers’ knowledge of second language pronunciation techniques: Teacher cognitions, observed classroom practices, and student perceptions. TESOL Quarterly, 48(1), 136–163. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Baker, A., & Murphy, J.
(2011) Knowledge base of pronunciation teaching: Staking out the territory. TESL Canada Journal, 28(2), 29–50.Google Scholar
Borg, S.
(2003) Teacher cognition in language teaching: A review of research on what language teachers think, know, believe and do. Language Teaching, 36(2), 81–109. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Breitkreutz, J.A., Derwing, T.M., & Rossiter, M.J.
(2001) Pronunciation teaching practices in Canada. TESL Canada Journal, 19(1), 51–61. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Brinton, D.
(2014) Epilogue to the myths: Best practices for teachers. In L. Grant (Ed.), Pronunciation myths: Applying second language research to classroom teaching (pp. 225–242). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
Burgess, J., & Spencer, S.
(2000) Phonology and pronunciation in integrated language teaching and teacher education. System, 28, 191–215. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Burns, A.
(2006) Integrating research and professional development on pronunciation teaching in a national adult ESL program. TESL Reporter, 39, 34–41.Google Scholar
Buss, L.
(2013) Pronunciation from the perspective of pre-service EFL teachers: An analysis of internship reports. In J. Levis & K. LeVelle (Eds.), Proceedings of the 4th pronunciation in second language learning and teaching conference. Aug. 2012. (pp. 255–264). Ames, IA: Iowa State University.Google Scholar
Cauldwell, R.
(2013) Phonology for listening: Teaching the stream of speech. Birmingham, UK: Speech in Action.Google Scholar
Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D., Goodwin, J., & Griner, B.
(2010) Teaching pronunciation: A course book and reference guide (2nd ed.). Cambridge, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Couper, G.
(2009) Teaching and learning L2 pronunciation: Understanding the effectiveness of socially constructed metalanguage and critical listening in terms of a cognitive phonology framework. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of New England, Armidale, Australia.Google Scholar
(2011) What makes pronunciation teaching work? Testing for the effect of two variables: Socially constructed metalanguage and critical listening. Language Awareness, 20(3), 159–182. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2012) Teaching word stress: Learning from learners’ perceptions. TESOL in Context S3 (November 2012) Retrieved from http://​www​.tesol​.org​.au​/Publications​/Special​-EditionsGoogle Scholar
(2013) Talking about pronunciation: Socially constructing metalanguage. English Australia, 29(1), 3–18.Google Scholar
Croker, R.
(2009) An introduction to qualitative research. In J. Heigham & R. Croker (Eds.), Qualitative research in applied linguistics: A practical introduction (pp. 3–24). Houndmills, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dauer, R.
(1993) Accurate English: A complete course in pronunciation. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall Regents.Google Scholar
Derwing, T., & Munro, M.
(2005) Second language accent and pronunciation teaching: A research-based approach. TESOL Quarterly, 39(3), 379–397. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2014) Myth 1: Once you have been speaking a second language for years, it’s too late to change your pronunciation. In L. Grant (Ed.), Pronunciation myths: Applying second language research to classroom teaching (pp. 56–79). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
Dlaska, A., & Krekeler, C.
(2013) The short-term effects of individual corrective feedback on L2 pronunciation. System, 41, 25–37. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Field, J.
(2008) Listening in the language classroom. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Foote, J.A., Holtby, A.K., & Derwing, T.M.
(2011) Survey of the teaching of pronunciation in adult ESL programs in Canada, 2010. TESL Canada Journal, 29(1), 1–22. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Foote, J., Trofimovich, P., Collins, L., & Soler Urzúa, F.
(2014) Pronunciation teaching practices in communicative second language classes. Language Learning Journal (early view). CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Fraser, H.
(2000) Coordinating improvements in pronunciation teaching for adult learners of English as a second language. Canberra, Australia: DETYA. Retrieved February 11, 2015, from http://​helenfraser​.com​.au​/publications/Google Scholar
(2001) Teaching pronunciation: A handbook for teachers and trainers. Sydney, Australia: TAFE NSW Access Division. Retrieved February 11, 2015, from http://​helenfraser​.com​.au​/publications/Google Scholar
(2006) Helping teachers help students with pronunciation: A cognitive approach. Prospect, 21(1), 80–96.Google Scholar
(2009) Pronunciation as categorization: The role of contrast in teaching English /r/ and /l/. In A. Mahboob & C. Lipovsky (Eds.), Studies in applied linguistics and language learning (pp. 289–306). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars.Google Scholar
(2010) Cognitive theory as a tool for teaching second language pronunciation. In S. de Knop, F. Boers, & T. de Rycker (Eds.), Fostering language teaching efficiency through cognitive linguistics (pp. 357–379). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gilbert, J.
(2010) Why has pronunciation been an orphan? IATEFL Pronunciation Special Interest Group Newsletter, 43, 3–7.Google Scholar
(2012) Clear speech: Pronunciation and listening comprehension in North American English; Teacher’s resource and assessment book (4th ed.). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2014) Myth 4: Intonation is hard to teach. In L. Grant (Ed.), Pronunciation myths: Applying second language research to classroom teaching (pp. 107–136). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
Grant, L.
(2014a) Prologue to the myths: What teachers need to know. In L. Grant (Ed.), Pronunciation myths: Applying second language research to classroom teaching (pp. 1–33). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
(2014b) Myth 5: Students would make better progress in pronunciation if they just practiced more. In L. Grant (Ed.), Pronunciation myths: Applying second language research to classroom teaching (pp. 137–159). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
(Ed.) (2014c) Pronunciation myths: Applying second language research to classroom teaching. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Henderson, A., Frost, D., Tergujeff, E., Kautzsch, A., Murphy, D., Kirkova-Naskova, A., Waniek-Klimczak, E., Levey, D., Cunningham, U., & Curnick, L.
(2012) The English pronunciation teaching in Europe survey: Selected results. Research in Language, 10(1), 1–23. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kennedy, S., Blanchet, J., & Trofimovich, P.
(2014) Learner pronunciation, awareness, and instruction in French as a second language. Foreign Language Annals, 47(1), 79–96. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kvale, S.
(2007) Analyzing interviews. In S. Kvale (Ed.), Doing interviews (pp. 102–120). London, UK: Sage. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lane, L.
(2010) Tips for teaching pronunciation: A practical approach. White Plains, NY: Pearson/Longman.Google Scholar
Levis, J., & Grant, L.
(2003) Integrating pronunciation into ESL/EFL classrooms. TESOL Journal, 12(2), 13–19. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lee, J., Jang, J., & Plonsky, L.
(2015) The effectiveness of second language pronunciation instruction: A meta-analysis. Applied Linguistics, 36(3), 345–366. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lyster, R., Saito, K., & Sato, M.
(2013) Oral corrective feedback in second language classrooms. Language Teaching, 46, 1–40. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Macdonald, S.
(2002) Pronunciation views and practices of reluctant teachers. Prospect, 17(3), 3–18.Google Scholar
Murphy, D.
(2011) An investigation of English pronunciation teaching in Ireland. English Today, 27(4), 10–18. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Murphy, J.
(2014a) Intelligible, comprehensible, non-native models in ESL/EFL pronunciation teaching. System, 42, 258–269. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2014b) Myth 7: Teacher training programs provide adequate preparation in how to teach pronunciation. In L. Grant (Ed.), Pronunciation myths: Applying second language research to classroom teaching (pp. 188–224). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
Polkinghorne, D.
(1995) Narrative configuration in qualitative analysis. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 8(1), 5–23. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Saito, K.
(2012) Effects of instruction on L2 pronunciation development: A synthesis of quasi-experimental intervention studies. TESOL Quarterly, 46(4), 842–854. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Saito, K., & van Poeteren, K.
(2012) Pronunciation-specific adjustment strategies for intelligibility in L2 teacher talk: Results and implications of a questionnaire study. Language Awareness, 21(4), 1–17. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sifakis, N.C., & Sougari, A.-M.
(2005) Pronunciation issues and EIL pedagogy in the periphery: A survey of Greek state school teachers’ beliefs. TESOL Quarterly, 39, 467–488. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Starfield, S.
(2010) Ethnographies. In B. Paltridge & A. Phakiti (Eds.), Continuum companion to research methods in applied linguistics (pp. 50–65). London: Continuum.Google Scholar
Sturm, J.
(2013) Explicit phonetics instruction in L2 French: A global analysis of improvement. System, 41, 654–662. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Swan, M., & Smith, B.
(2001) Learner English: A teacher’s guide to interference and other problems. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Zielinski, B., & Yates, L.
(2014) Myth 2: Pronunciation instruction is not appropriate for beginning-level learners. In L. Grant (Ed.), Pronunciation myths: Applying second language research to classroom teaching (pp. 56–79). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar